Are you following me on Twitter?

Oh my gosh, I just realized you’re not following me on Twitter.

Quick, click here:
www.twitter.com/dreamplaywrite

Crisis averted. Whew!

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Wow, you’re all signing up for the Writing Challenge! This is amazing

I’m floored.

I’m also flabbergasted and a little flush, but most of all, flattered.

Why? Because so many of you are hopping aboard, and saying “YES!” to moving forward with your novels. Writing, as you know, is all about momentum, drive, and sheer willpower.

And now I’m looking extra-forward (can I say that?) to October’s 10K Social Writing Challenge. It will be exciting to meet all the newcomers, and welcome back the talented writers who have done it before.

But the best part is that you too can meet everyone. Ready to have a slew of new writer friends? New professional contacts? New fans? All of these await you.

The part I like best about this Challenge is that we all help each other out. Feedback is asked for, feedback is given. Motivation comes not just from me—every day in your e-mail inbox—but from others who read your work, cheer you on, and participate in our Facebook discussion group.

And of course, awards are given.

Are you ready for this? Learn more and sign up

Registration now open! 10,000-word Writing Challenge starts October 1

Learn more about TimExciting news, writers! Registration has officially opened for the ChapterBuzz 10K Social Writing Challenge.

Is October the month you start on that novel?

If your answer is a resounding “YES!”, sign up today:
whatinspiresyourwriting.wordpress.com/challenge

The Challenge kicks off October 1st, and you’ll be writing 10,000 words, so bring a pen full of ink and some great ideas.

I hope you’re as excited about this as I am! Get your novel on

Are you the next BREAKOUT STAR of the writing world?

This is your chance to shine! Join the ChapterBuzz 10K Social Writing Challenge, starting October 1st.

Awards will be given to emerging writers based on several factors: how much attention your manuscript is getting, how other participants respond to your work, and of course, raw writing ability.

Hunker down for the month of October and get a great head start on your novel. Your goal is to write 10,000 words (about 350 words a day), and don’t worry—I’ll send you e-mails each day to keep you motivated and make sure you are on target!

Are you the next breakout star of the writing world? Well, I suppose you’ll never know unless you try. Get in on this opportunity

Want to be an award-winning writer by next month?

Yes, it could happen.

And happen suddenly, too: one day you’re a regular writer, the next day you’re an award-winning author.

How? By entering the ChapterBuzz 10K Social Writing Challenge.

Many people have it in their heads that winning an award is a long, drawn-out process that can only happen once their books are published, and involves filling out lots of applications and sending their books off to a host of organizations, just to have a shot at gaining a shred of recognition.

Not at all. The truth?

You can win an award at any stage of the writing process. And that award is yours forever—no matter what—so the cover of your book can show off this fact (“An award-winning novel”), and any book you publish from then on is “From award-winning author (insert your name here).”

And…you can have fun in the process!

I, in conjunction with ChapterBuzz, was thrilled to give awards to Liberty Henwick, Barry B. Wright, and Dacia Arnold for their amazing efforts during the last 10K Writing Challenge.

We had a blast, some genuinely incredible books emerged, awards were given.

This October, are you with us? Learn more and get reminders

Registration for this Writing Challenge opens Monday!

The ChapterBuzz 10K Writing Challenge opens for official registration on Monday.

What is it?

It’s a one-month writing extravaganza, running from October 1–October 31, where your challenge is to write 10,000 words.

Bottom line: it’s your chance to start that novel you’ve always wanted to, or add 10,000 words to a manuscript that’s already in progress.

It’s also a great opportunity to get valuable feedback on what you’re writing.

Registration opens Monday. You can learn more and get on the reminders list on this page.

Last time was a lot of fun for everyone involved…this time will be no different!

~Tim

When writing a novel, there’s no shame in asking for help

We writers can be a solitary bunch, no doubt. Many of us, no matter how outgoing we may be around others, still value our alone time.

Our writing time.

There’s just something about retreating to a private nook—or favorite outdoor spot—and letting your mind wander into the world of your novel, knowing your story is limited only by your imagination and can go in any direction you choose.

It’s your story, so you call the shots.

Unfortunately, this freedom can backfire. Many of us are happy to operate in solitude from start to finish, but at some point other people will be involved. They’re called readers, and since conventional wisdom tells us no one will read the book until it’s published, our readers are often the very last people we think of.

But they should be the first.

After all, why do all that work, then release your book on nothing but a wing and a prayer? After spending vast amounts of time and energy over the course of many months—or years—you don’t want to just cross your fingers and hope that your intended audience will appreciate what you wrote.

You want to know for sure.

Fortunately, you can, and it’s called the Early Feedback Method.

This method allows you to write in solitude and stay in touch with the outside world—that is, with those who are eventually going to read and buy your book.

Here’s the underlying principle: the more feedback you get in the beginning, the better. Why? Because you want to make sure that what you’re writing is resonating with your audience. That way, you can better focus your efforts.

Being open to feedback doesn’t mean that just because one person doesn’t like something, you have to take it out. But what you’re looking for is that your story works, and the comments of your early readers will give you a feel for that. They’ll point out plot holes. They’ll find inconsistencies. They’ll tell you the pacing is a little off. And the most astute among them will have some ideas for how to fix it.

What you’ll end up with is a rock-solid foundation to build your novel on, and once you have that, writing the rest is a whole lot easier, and requires only minor adjustments.

Want to try out the Early Feedback Method? The 10K Social Writing Challenge is an excellent opportunity, and it starts October 1. Join here, and see how a “Social” month of interacting with other writers can help you improve your story!